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Introduction
Sources:
Africa 2006,

The slave trade, especially during the 17th and 18th centuries, had a massive impact on the old kingdoms in this region, decimating their populations. By the turn of the 19th Century the French established themselves at Bangui and founded the colony of Ubangi-Chari (named after two major rivers). Local resistance to excesses by French companies who administered the territory culminated in the Kongo Wara wars from 1928 until 1931. In 1960 CAR achieved independence under the one party rule of President David Dacko. Five years later his cousin, sergeant Jean-Bédel Bokassa, seized power, declared himself president in 1972 and ultimately crowned himself emperor in 1977. In 1979, Bokassa's brutal rule came to an end when French troops reinstated Dacko. Two years later Dacko was once again ousted in a military coup, this time by Gen. André Kolingba. In 1993 internal and international pressures forced Kolingba to hold a multi-parry presidential election. He lost to Ange-Félix Patassé, who once served in Bokassa's cabinet. Patassé was reelected in September 1999, defeating Kolingba and several other candidates. African forces and the UN Mission in the Central African Republic (MINURCA) helped maintain stability until March 2003, when Patassé was ousted in a coup by François Bozizé. In the May 2005 election he easily defeated Martin Ziguélé, a former prime minister, in presidential elections.


Introduction
Sources:
Africa 2006,

The slave trade, especially during the 17th and 18th centuries, had a massive impact on the old kingdoms in this region, decimating their populations. By the turn of the 19th Century the French established themselves at Bangui and founded the colony of Ubangi-Chari (named after two major rivers). Local resistance to excesses by French companies who administered the territory culminated in the Kongo Wara wars from 1928 until 1931. In 1960 CAR achieved independence under the one party rule of President David Dacko. Five years later his cousin, sergeant Jean-Bédel Bokassa, seized power, declared himself president in 1972 and ultimately crowned himself emperor in 1977. In 1979, Bokassa's brutal rule came to an end when French troops reinstated Dacko. Two years later Dacko was once again ousted in a military coup, this time by Gen. André Kolingba. In 1993 internal and international pressures forced Kolingba to hold a multi-parry presidential election. He lost to Ange-Félix Patassé, who once served in Bokassa's cabinet. Patassé was reelected in September 1999, defeating Kolingba and several other candidates. African forces and the UN Mission in the Central African Republic (MINURCA) helped maintain stability until March 2003, when Patassé was ousted in a coup by François Bozizé. In the May 2005 election he easily defeated Martin Ziguélé, a former prime minister, in presidential elections.


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